Get our free newsletter.|Already signed up? Please log in here.
|Text size: A A A

The best multivitamins and what they should contain

What do the best multivitamins contain?

Have you bought multivitamins lately? Have you heard they can prevent a cold? Or perhaps that multivitamins are useless? Or that they could even lead to a shorter life? There’s certainly a ton of debate.

It can be pretty confusing, to say the least. There are multivitamins for every age group, for men and women, some that are for athletes, and some for the weekend warrior.

Some multivitamins contain extra Vitamin D, or C, or Calcium, or Iron. Then, of course, there are name brands and store brands. How can you tell which multivitamins are the best multivitamins?   Read More

Is a Low Salt Diet Plan Healthy?

Clearing the air on low salt diets

High blood pressure is the leading cause of preventable deaths around the world. But did the Institute of Medicine (IOM) really say that lowering salt consumption is not the answer?

“Lowering daily sodium intake below 2,300 milligrams may do more harm than good,” reported CBS News in May 2013. “No benefit in sharply restricting salt, panel finds,” said The New York Times. “Is eating too little salt risky?” asked National Public Radio. “New report raises questions.”   Read More

The Best Yogurts For Your Health: Greek or Regular?

We’ve weeded through the yogurt aisle to create a list of the best yogurts that are both delicious and healthy.

The yogurt aisle isn’t what it used to be. In the last few years, greek yogurt has taken over a sizeable chunk of the refrigerator case, leaving non-greeks to compete for the remaining real estate.

Meanwhile, both greek and non-greek yogurts are branching out. Fat-free? Cream on top? You got ‘em. Fruit purée or fruit mousse? Yep. Lactose-free or no dairy at all? Got you covered. And as for toppings and mix-ins, strawberry and vanilla are battling for shelf space with fig and orange zest, and chocolate-coated corn flakes. With so many options, how can you know which yogurts are the best yogurts?

Our recommendations (✔✔) are plain unsweetened yogurts. We’ve listed the criteria—maximums for calories and saturated fat and minimums for protein and calcium—at the beginning of each section. We disqualified products with artificial sweeteners. Within each section, yogurts are ranked from least to most calories, then least to most saturated fat, most to least protein, and most to least calcium.   Read More

Best in Beans

Whole Foods 365 Organic No Salt Added Beans are low in sodium and BPA-free

You can’t beat beans.

They’re rich in fiber, protein, magnesium, potassium, iron, copper, and folate, and they’re low in saturated fat, sugar, and sodium.

Well, they start out low in sodium. But   Read More

Food poisoning from eggs “the worst thing I’ve ever been through”

Are eggs from cage-free hens safer?

It’s the worst thing I’ve ever been through,” Robin Shaffer recalled. “I had no energy. You’d try to keep something in you and it just comes out.”

When Shaffer ate an enchilada, bean burrito, and chile relleno combo meal at a Mexican restaurant in Bemidji, Minnesota, she had no idea that raw eggs tainted with Salmonella bacteria had contaminated her food in the kitchen. That food poisoning from eggs would knock Shaffer off her feet for three weeks. “My life was literally the toilet,” she told a local TV station.

Shaffer and six other diners at the restaurant were among the first of what would become more than 1,600 documented victims of the largest outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis food poisoning from eggs since the government began compiling statistics in 1973.   Read More

What’s the healthiest diet to follow if you’re not a vegetarian?

Here's what top nutrition researchers found.

What does a healthy diet look like? Despite (or maybe because of) all the diet books, food pyramids, and expert advice, most people are still confused.
Yet we know which diets can lower the risk of heart disease, the major cause of death in the United States. Odds are, those same foods can also promote weight loss and help prevent diabetes and cancer. The Omniheart diet shows a lot of promise as a healthful diet.
The OmniHeart Trial tested three variations of a vegetable-and-fruit-rich diet in people who had pre-hypertension or hypertension—that is, anyone with blood pressure above 120 over 80.   Read More

Should You Drink Chocolate Milk After a Workout?

If the world's greatest athletes drink chocolate milk after a workout, should you?

“Beverage of champions: Chocolate milk gets an Olympic-style makeover,” reported the Washington Post in January after ads featuring U.S. Olympic athletes began popping up during the Sochi winter games. Olympic athletes have access to the best in exercise regimens and health and nutrition advice. If they drink chocolate milk post workout, should you?

When it comes to recovering from intense exercise, this classic childhood beverage has taken the spotlight.

In some studies, drinking chocolate milk immediately after a strenuous workout is one of the best ways to recover quickly—better than sugary sports drinks like Gatorade. The milk’s naturally occurring sugar (lactose) is half glucose, its protein speeds up glycogen synthesis in the body, and its electrolytes (like potassium and, to a lesser extent, sodium) help you rehydrate.   Read More

Is Paleo Healthy? Should We Be Eating Like Cave Men and Women?

In modern terms, what does Paleo look like, and is a paleo diet healthy?

“If it wasn’t on a caveman’s menu, it shouldn’t be on yours.” That’s the basic premise of a Paleo diet. The question remains, as it should for any diet—is Paleo healthy?

Maybe you’ve heard of the Nordic diet, the Mediterranean diet, and more recently, the gluten-free diet, but these are all very different from the primal diet known as Paleo.

But is the Paleo diet healthy?
  Read More

The Best Fish for Your Health and the Earth

Seven popular fish and finding a balance between the best fish for your health and for your dinner table

Which seafood choices are good for you…and the planet? There are plenty of reasons to be wary of seafood, such as possible PCBs, mercury, antibiotic residues, dioxins, sea lice in ocean pens, leveled mangrove forests, and depleted fish stocks.

But there also are plenty of reasons to eat it. People who consume more seafood have a lower risk of heart disease, stroke, and Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers aren’t sure if that’s because of DHA and EPA, the omega-3 fats in fish, or because seafood eaters do other things to protect their health. Still, seafood is low in saturated fat and rich in protein…and flavor.   Read More

The 4 Safest Sugar Substitutes and a Few to Avoid Completely

Here are what we found to be the safest sugar substitutes currently available.

The best and safest artificial sweeteners are erythritol, xylitol, stevia leaf extracts, neotame, and mon fruit extract—with some caveats:

• Erythritol: Large amounts (more than about 40 or 50 grams or 10 or 12 teaspoons) of this sugar alcohol sometimes cause nausea, but smaller amounts are fine. (Sensitivities vary among individuals.) Erythritol, small amounts of which occur naturally in some fruits, is about 60 to 70 percent as sweet as table sugar and has at most one-twentieth as many calories. Unlike the high-potency sweeteners, erythritol provides the bulk and “mouth feel” of sugar.

• Xylitol: This sugar alcohol, which occurs naturally in birch and some other plants, is about as sweet as table sugar and has about three quarters of the calories. Too much xylitol (about 30–40 grams or 7–10 teaspoons, although sensitivities vary) could produce a laxative effect and/or gastrointestinal distress.   Read More

Notice: Content at this site is not intended to provide medical advice, which should be obtained from a qualified health professional. Any products evaluated or sources cited may contain information that is now outdated. Readers should check product labels to ensure any nutrient content has not changed since our review and still meets the criteria established by NutritionAction.com.

© 2017 NutritionAction.com • All rights reserved. Use of any content without prior permission is strictly prohibited.

1220 L Street, N.W., Suite 300 • Washington, DC 20005 • NutritionAction.com®, a division of the non-profit Center for Science in the Public Interest.

.