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Paige Einstein

Paige Einstein

Paige Einstein is a Project Coordinator for Nutrition Action Healthletter. She is a Registered Dietitian and, prior to joining CSPI, worked for a private medical and surgical weight-loss practice where she provided nutritional counseling services to patients. Paige graduated from Virginia Tech with a degree in Dietetics and completed her dietetic internship at California State University in Sacramento.

Article Index

Want to Know How Much Caffeine is in Tea?

Want to Know How Much Caffeine is in Tea?

Tea is in. The average American drinks some 155 cups a year. That makes tea the country’s fourth most popular beverage, after water, soft drinks, and coffee.

There is no doubt that tea is an invigorating drink – probably due to how much caffeine is in tea (about half the caffeine of coffee).

And the national waistline would be far better off if we replaced some of that soda with tea (provided we sipped it with little or no sugar).   Read More

Beware of Caffeine in Ice Cream and Frozen Yogurt

More than 80 percent of American adults consume caffeine regularly. That’s no surprise, what with a coffee shop seemingly on every corner and in every supermarket, and tiny $3 bottles of 5-hour Energy popping up like mushrooms wherever there’s a checkout counter. It turns out, though, that there is also caffeine in ice cream and frozen yogurt.

How does caffeine work in the body?

Caffeine works mainly by temporarily binding to adenosine receptors in the brain. That prevents adenosine, which is a natural sedative produced by the brain, from occupying those receptors and making us feel drowsy. Adenosine levels build up during waking hours and then drop as we sleep.

People who don’t use caffeine regularly and who haven’t developed a dependence on it “usually become significantly more alert and better able to perform cognitive and motor tasks – such as paying attention during boring tasks or typing – if they’re given the right dose of caffeine,” says Laura Juliano, a professor of psychology at American University in Washington, D.C.

  Read More

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