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Daily Tips

Should You Drink Chocolate Milk Post Workout?

If the world's greatest athletes drink chocolate milk post workout, should you?

“Beverage of champions: Chocolate milk gets an Olympic-style makeover,” reported the Washington Post in January after ads featuring U.S. Olympic athletes began popping up during the Sochi winter games. Olympic athletes have access to the best in exercise regimens and health and nutrition advice. If they drink chocolate milk post workout, should you?

When it comes to recovering from intense exercise, this classic childhood beverage has taken the spotlight.

In some studies, drinking chocolate milk immediately after a strenuous workout is one of the best ways to recover quickly—better than sugary sports drinks like Gatorade. The milk’s naturally occurring sugar (lactose) is half glucose, its protein speeds up glycogen synthesis in the body, and its electrolytes (like potassium and, to a lesser extent, sodium) help you rehydrate.   Read More

How to Sanitize a Sponge: Are Your Kitchen Sponges Safe?

Keep your kitchen safe by learning how to sanitize a sponge the right way.

“Sponges are usually the dirtiest thing in the kitchen and difficult to keep clean,” says microbiologist Manan Sharma of the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety Laboratory in Beltsville, Maryland

NSF International offers good reason to know how to sanitize a sponge; in a recent survey of U.S. homes they found 77 percent of the sponges and dish cloths contained coliform bacteria, 86 percent had yeast and mold, and 18 percent had Staph bacteria. NSF International is a non-profit agency that sets safety standards for water filters and other equipment.   Read More

How to Cook Chickpeas (Or Eat Them Out of the Can)

They're good cold, but when you know how to cook chickpeas, the possibilities are magnificent.

Chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans, were originally cultivated in the Middle East and Mediterranean regions. This legume is one of the oldest domesticated crops in history.

To this day, chickpeas are a staple food of those cuisines, as well as Indian cuisine.

You may have come across them in dahl or hummus, and deliciously spiced Tunisian and Moroccan tagine meals turn chickpeas into a gastronomic delicacy. Chickpeas have a nutty flavor, but easily accommodate a variety of herbs and spices.   Read More

What is a Healthy Salad Dressing?

The most healthy salad dressings you can buy or make yourself

Still think of salad as a small bowl of lettuce, a wedge of tomato, and a few slices of cucumber? News flash: Salads have moved beyond those sad little side dishes.

Today, they come with an endless variety of greens, veggies, fruit, nuts, beans, and more. With some extra protein, they can even take center stage, replacing your carb-heavy, veggie-poor sandwich or pasta as a main dish.

So what is a healthy salad dressing, then? If you haven’t moved beyond Wish-Bone Italian, it’s time for a change. Here’s a guide to the best dressings in a bottle…and a few to whip up yourself.   Read More

Memorial Day Grilling Tips to Avoid Burned Meat Carcinogens

Keep your Memorial Day barbecues light and healthy by using these tips to avoid burned meat on the grill

Enjoy a safer Memorial Day weekend by not overcooking your meat or poul­try. The browner it is, the more likely that it contains a group of compounds called heterocyclic amines (HCAs) which may raise the risk of cancer. This Memorial Day, in the name of health, avoid eating and serving burned meat to your guests.

“Heterocyclic amines are formed when meats are cooked to well done at high temperatures,” explains Amanda Cross, formerly at the U.S. National Cancer Institute. “Animal studies showed that they are carcinogenic.”   Read More

The Best Fish for Your Health and the Earth

Seven popular fish and finding a balance between the best fish for your health and for your dinner table

Which seafood choices are good for you…and the planet? There are plenty of reasons to be wary of seafood, such as possible PCBs, mercury, antibiotic residues, dioxins, sea lice in ocean pens, leveled mangrove forests, and depleted fish stocks.

But there also are plenty of reasons to eat it. People who consume more seafood have a lower risk of heart disease, stroke, and Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers aren’t sure if that’s because of DHA and EPA, the omega-3 fats in fish, or because seafood eaters do other things to protect their health. Still, seafood is low in saturated fat and rich in protein…and flavor.   Read More

Celiac Disease Symptoms: Sorting Out Gluten-Free Confusion

A Gastroenterologist explains how to decipher whether you have celiac disease symptoms or symptoms of gluten intolerance

Stomach pain, diarrhea, weight loss. Those are some celiac disease symptoms, which is an autoimmune reaction to gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye.

At least one out of 100 Americans have celiac. Most of them don’t know it. And studies suggest that some people who don’t have the disease still can’t tolerate gluten and will experience celiac disease symptoms. Here’s the latest on a problem that is causing much confusion.   Read More

Don’t Take Diabetes Advice From Strangers

Looking for diabetes advice in all the wrong places? Don't be fooled—take this advice instead.

Maybe you have diabetes. Maybe your blood glucose isn’t that high yet, but it’s starting to rise.

You’ve read that losing weight is the best way to get your blood sugar down. And you’d like to shed those 15 or 25 extra pounds. Maybe you’ll start next week.

Then the online ad catches your eye. A “breakthrough”… “secrets the medical establishment doesn’t want you to see”…diabetes advice from researchers with a “moral duty” to get the word out about their “miracle cure.”

That’s worth 30 bucks, right?
  Read More

How to Avoid Cancer: Reducing Your Risk for 9 Different Cancers

Reduce your risk factors and learn how to avoid cancer through changes in diet, weight loss and exercise habits specific to nine different types of cancer

One in three women. One in two men.That’s how many of us can expect to be diagnosed with cancer in our lifetimes. Of course, those are averages. A smoker is 25 times more likely to get lung cancer than a nonsmoker. Tobacco alone accounts for about a third of all cancer deaths in the U.S. Back when cigarettes were still deemed healthy, people weren’t worrying about how to avoid cancer nearly as much.
But smoking isn’t the only preventable cause of cancer. Experts estimate that we could dodge up to a third of all cancers by eating healthier, eating less, and moving more.

No one can guarantee that you won’t get cancer. But you can lower your cancer risk.   Read More

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