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Daily Tips

Magnesium-Rich Foods Could Help Prevent Diabetes

Magnesium-rich foods aren't just delicious, they also benefit your health.

An estimated 23.6 million Americans —including one out of four people aged 60 or older—have Type 2 diabetes. Roughly 5.7 million of them don’t know it. And 57 million others have pre-diabetes.

However, there is evidence that magnesium-rich foods can help prevent Type-2 diabetes.

Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely than others to have a stroke or to die of heart disease.   Read More

Is Canola Oil Healthy?

The truth about canola oil and whether it's healthy

“Poisonous.” “Toxic.” “Avoid like the plague.”

Is canola oil healthy? For some reason, people love to hate it. Really hate it.

That’s partly because the canola plant is derived from rapeseed, which contains a toxic compound called erucic acid and bitter-tasting compounds called glucosinolates.   Read More

9 Ways to Pick the Best Healthy Lunch Meats

Some "healthy lunch meats" aren't as healthy as they claim. Here is how to read those labels.

Talk about confusing. A “natural” or “no nitrites added” lunch meat could deliver as much nitrite as a lunch meat that lists sodium nitrite in the ingredients list. And a “lower sodium” lunch meat could have more salt than a lunch meat that makes no sodium claims.

Labels will say whatever it takes to get your attention. Forget the malarkey. Here are nine ways to choose the best healthy lunch meats before you break out the mustard.

1. Know your serving.

Cutting back on salt? When looking at nutrition labels, the answer may seem obvious, but there’s a catch: ounce for ounce, the one may have less sodium and just look like it has more because its label uses a 2oz. serving, while the other uses 1oz. Bottom line: before you compare lunch meats, make sure you’re looking at the same serving size.
  Read More

8 Examples of When Caffeine is Good for You

Have another cup and relax; caffeine is good for you*

Most people rely on caffeine to stay alert. But researchers suggest that it may do far more—lowering the risk of Parkinson’s disease and gallstones, for example. Here’s what you may not know about the times that caffeine is good for you.

* This information does not apply to women who are pregnant (or trying to become pregnant) or to children. Nor does it apply to caffeine powder or highly concentrated liquid caffeine, which can be lethal.   Read More

How To Make Zoodles: The Ultimate Gluten Free Noodle

It doesn’t matter if it’s spaghetti with marinara, meatballs, puttanesca, pesto, clam, or another sauce. No matter how you serve it, people love their pasta. But what about pasta alternatives? Do you know how to make zoodles (zucchini noodles) or another vegetable based pasta?

The problem is, spaghetti and its relatives have around 200 calories per cup. And if you eat as much at home as you’re served at a typical restaurant, you can multiply those 200 calories by 3. That’s almost twice as much grain as most people should eat in a day. (So no cereal or bread or rice for you tomorrow.)

But that was the pasta of the past. Now you can make your own pasta…out of vegetables.   Read More

How to Cut Calorie Density (Plus Three Recipes)

To cut the calorie density in your foods, try these three recipes

Eating foods with fewer calories per bite can help people eat less and stay trim. But what’s the best way to cut calorie density?

One day a week for four weeks, scientists provided all the food (breakfast, lunch, dinner, and evening snack) eaten by 59 adults aged 20 to 45. On those days, the researchers lowered the calorie density of the entrées by 20 percent in one of three ways: adding less fat (butter or oil), increasing fruits and vegetables, or adding water. (For example, the researchers added water to a Tex-Mex pasta casserole and a chicken rice casserole by turning them into soups.)   Read More

How to Prepare a Roasted Summer Vegetable Salad

This summer salad recipe is quick, delicious, and nutritious.

With summer coming up, it’s great to have healthy recipes for preparing salads that use seasonal items such as summer vegetables. Here is a roasted summer salad recipe that is easy to make, delicious, nutritious, and absolutely beautiful when served!

Ingredients:
3 bell peppers, quartered lengthwise
½ lb. small zucchini, cut into ½-inch rounds
½ lb. baby eggplant, cut into ½ inch thick rounds
1 bunch scallions
3 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup fresh basil leaves, chopped
4 cups baby arugula, chopped
2 Tbs. aged balsamic vinegar
¼ tsp. kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Put the peppers on a baking sheet, skin side up. Roast under the broiler until charred, about 12 minutes. Put the zucchini, eggplant, and scallions on a baking sheet and brush with olive oil. Roast under the broiler until browned and tender.
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What Foods Cause Gas? Beans, Vegetables, Milk, or Something Else?

You may be surprised to find out which foods cause gas.

Beans, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, milk, bran. Those are some of the usual suspects when people are trying to figure out, ahem, what foods cause gas. And those foods can cause gas.

But most of us overlook a growing source of the problem: inulin, or chicory root extract, one of the most popular ingredients in “high-fiber” foods.   Read More

The Extra Benefits of Walking Daily You Might Not Know

From reducing weight to lowering the risk of diabetes, the extra benefits of walking daily are yours for the taking.

Staying active can help keep your brain in good shape, say two studies that tracked exercise and mental decline over time.

And the extra benefits of walking daily are clear in these studies.

In the first, which followed more than 2,200 Hawaiian men aged 71 to 93, those who walked the least (less than a quarter mile a day) were nearly twice as likely to be diagnosed with dementia than those who walked the most (more than two miles a day) over the next seven years. Men who walked between a quarter and one mile a day had a 70 percent increased risk.

In a second study, which tracked nearly 19,000 women aged 70 to 81 for at least nine years, those who exercised the most had a 20 percent lower risk of cognitive impairment than those who exercised the least. Women who walked for at least 11/2 hours a week scored better on memory, attention, and other tests than women who walked less than 40 minutes a week.   Read More

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