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Keyword: disease

What’s the healthiest diet to follow if you’re not a vegetarian?

Here's what top nutrition researchers found.

What does a healthy diet look like? Despite (or maybe because of) all the diet books, food pyramids, and expert advice, most people are still confused.
Yet we know which diets can lower the risk of heart disease, the major cause of death in the United States. Odds are, those same foods can also promote weight loss and help prevent diabetes and cancer. The Omniheart diet shows a lot of promise as a healthful diet.
The OmniHeart Trial tested three variations of a vegetable-and-fruit-rich diet in people who had pre-hypertension or hypertension—that is, anyone with blood pressure above 120 over 80.   Read More

Is a Low Salt Diet Plan Healthy?

Clearing the air on low salt diets

High blood pressure is the leading cause of preventable deaths around the world. But did the Institute of Medicine (IOM) really say that lowering salt consumption is not the answer?

“Lowering daily sodium intake below 2,300 milligrams may do more harm than good,” reported CBS News in May 2013. “No benefit in sharply restricting salt, panel finds,” said The New York Times. “Is eating too little salt risky?” asked National Public Radio. “New report raises questions.”   Read More

Do You Risk Popcorn Lung When You Make Microwave Popcorn?

That bag of microwave popcorn may smell good, but it's best to let the bag cool before you open it.

“Popcorn lung” is an irreversible scarring of the smallest airways in the lungs. It’s caused by inhaling vapors of a buttery-tasting chemical that some manufacturers may be adding to their microwave popcorn.

Diacetyl is a natural compound found in cheese, butter, yogurt, and wine. It’s not harmful when swallowed, but it can damage the lungs if large amounts are inhaled. Nearly all “popcorn lung” victims worked in popcorn or flavoring manufacturing facilities, where they breathed in the chemical every day. The most severe cases needed lung transplants.

Several consumers also claim to have popcorn lung, including a middle-aged man in Colorado who inhaled the buttery steam from the two bags of popcorn he microwaved every day for 10 years “because it smells good.” His $7 million award is being appealed by the supermarket chain that sold him the popcorn.   Read More

Healthy Food Quiz: Questions and Answers to Help You Fight Disease

This healthy food quiz - questions and answers included - will test your knowledge on what to eat.

Most people know that calcium is good for bones, fiber is good for constipation, and iron is good for blood, to name a few. But once you go beyond the basics, the picture gets murky.

Here’s a healthy food quiz (questions and answers included) to see how well you know which foods or nutrients can prevent or promote which diseases.

Feel free to cheat. The questions aren’t really a test of how well you read (and remember) every issue of Nutrition Action. They’re just a sneaky way to get you to look at the answers, which contain a wealth of information on how your diet affects your health.
  Read More

The 4 Safest Sugar Substitutes and a Few to Avoid Completely

Here are what we found to be the safest sugar substitutes currently available.

The best and safest artificial sweeteners are erythritol, xylitol, stevia leaf extracts, neotame, and mon fruit extract—with some caveats:

• Erythritol: Large amounts (more than about 40 or 50 grams or 10 or 12 teaspoons) of this sugar alcohol sometimes cause nausea, but smaller amounts are fine. (Sensitivities vary among individuals.) Erythritol, small amounts of which occur naturally in some fruits, is about 60 to 70 percent as sweet as table sugar and has at most one-twentieth as many calories. Unlike the high-potency sweeteners, erythritol provides the bulk and “mouth feel” of sugar.

• Xylitol: This sugar alcohol, which occurs naturally in birch and some other plants, is about as sweet as table sugar and has about three quarters of the calories. Too much xylitol (about 30–40 grams or 7–10 teaspoons, although sensitivities vary) could produce a laxative effect and/or gastrointestinal distress.   Read More

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