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The best multivitamins and what they should contain

What do the best multivitamins contain?

Have you bought multivitamins lately? Have you heard they can prevent a cold? Or perhaps that multivitamins are useless? Or that they could even lead to a shorter life? There’s certainly a ton of debate.

It can be pretty confusing, to say the least. There are multivitamins for every age group, for men and women, some that are for athletes, and some for the weekend warrior.

Some multivitamins contain extra Vitamin D, or C, or Calcium, or Iron. Then, of course, there are name brands and store brands. How can you tell which multivitamins are the best multivitamins?   Read More

Healthy Food Quiz: Questions and Answers to Help You Fight Disease

This healthy food quiz - questions and answers included - will test your knowledge on what to eat.

Most people know that calcium is good for bones, fiber is good for constipation, and iron is good for blood, to name a few. But once you go beyond the basics, the picture gets murky.

Here’s a healthy food quiz (questions and answers included) to see how well you know which foods or nutrients can prevent or promote which diseases.

Feel free to cheat. The questions aren’t really a test of how well you read (and remember) every issue of Nutrition Action. They’re just a sneaky way to get you to look at the answers, which contain a wealth of information on how your diet affects your health.
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Antioxidants and Cancer: What Are the Antioxidant Benefits?

Maybe those antioxidant benefits aren't so beneficial after all.

Antioxidants and cancer were supposed to be bitter enemies. We were told antioxidant benefits also included a reduction in heart disease, memory loss, type 2 diabetes, cataracts and macular degeneration. Antioxidant vitamins (C, E, and beta-carotene) were supposed to help prevent all of them.

So far, the three antioxidants (plus zinc) have succeeded with only one: slowing the pace of macular degeneration in older people who already have the eye disease.

“The randomized trials for antioxidants have been very disappointing,” says Harvard’s JoAnn Manson, who led the Women’s Antioxidant Cardiovascular Study, the Women’s Folic Acid Study, and other major trials.
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Do Intermittent Fasting Benefits Include Living Longer?

Intermittent fasting benefits seem promising in both animals and people.

“We’ve known for a long time that if you reduce the calorie intake of rats or mice, they live much longer,” says Mark Mattson, chief of the laboratory of neurosciences at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) in Baltimore. Do these intermittent fasting benefits carry over to humans?

What happens in species closer to humans is more complicated. Rhesus monkeys fed 30 percent fewer calories lived longer in a study at the University of Wisconsin, but not in a study at the NIA.   Read More

Is Caffeine a Cause of Urinary Incontinence?

If your morning coffee is causing urinary incontinence, kick the caffeine habit and exercise your pelvic muscles.

According to the International Continence Society (ICS), incontinence is the “involuntary loss of urine that is a social or hygienic problem and is objectively demonstrable.” Urinary incontinence is most commonly a result of bladder dysfunction, sphincter dysfunction, or a combination of both. An estimated 30 to 40 percent of middle-aged women and 50 percent of older women experience urinary leakage.

The problem is less common in men, but does increase with age. Even so, older men experience severe urinary incontinence at only about half the rate of women. Despite the prevalence of this health problem, it is still a “don’t ask, don’t tell” issue.

“In our study of nurses, less than 50 percent of the women who had incontinence reported it to their doctors,” says Mary Townsend, an epidemiologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

It is a sensitive issue, for sure, but what is the cause of urinary incontinence? Leaks are more common in women who are older, heavier, or smokers, and in those who have had more children, diabetes, or a hysterectomy.   Read More

Magnesium-Rich Foods to Prevent a Stroke

Among foods to prevent a stroke, magnesium-rich foods are a good choice

More magnesium may mean a lower risk of stroke.

Researchers looked at seven studies that followed a total of roughly 240,000 people for eight to 15 years. The risk of an ischemic stroke was 9 percent lower for each 100 milligrams of magnesium the participants reported eating per day. This may seem like a low number, but simple changes or additions in diet may offer complementary benefits. Preparing foods to prevent a stroke will often coincide with eating foods that are good for your overall health.   Read More

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