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Keyword: yogurt

The Best Yogurts For Your Health: Greek or Regular?

We’ve weeded through the yogurt aisle to create a list of the best yogurts that are both delicious and healthy.

The yogurt aisle isn’t what it used to be. In the last few years, greek yogurt has taken over a sizeable chunk of the refrigerator case, leaving non-greeks to compete for the remaining real estate.

Meanwhile, both greek and non-greek yogurts are branching out. Fat-free? Cream on top? You got ‘em. Fruit purée or fruit mousse? Yep. Lactose-free or no dairy at all? Got you covered. And as for toppings and mix-ins, strawberry and vanilla are battling for shelf space with fig and orange zest, and chocolate-coated corn flakes. With so many options, how can you know which yogurts are the best yogurts?

Our recommendations (✔✔) are plain unsweetened yogurts. We’ve listed the criteria—maximums for calories and saturated fat and minimums for protein and calcium—at the beginning of each section. We disqualified products with artificial sweeteners. Within each section, yogurts are ranked from least to most calories, then least to most saturated fat, most to least protein, and most to least calcium.   Read More

Healthy Food Quiz: Questions and Answers to Help You Fight Disease

This healthy food quiz - questions and answers included - will test your knowledge on what to eat.

Most people know that calcium is good for bones, fiber is good for constipation, and iron is good for blood, to name a few. But once you go beyond the basics, the picture gets murky.

Here’s a healthy food quiz (questions and answers included) to see how well you know which foods or nutrients can prevent or promote which diseases.

Feel free to cheat. The questions aren’t really a test of how well you read (and remember) every issue of Nutrition Action. They’re just a sneaky way to get you to look at the answers, which contain a wealth of information on how your diet affects your health.
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Beware of Caffeine in Ice Cream and Frozen Yogurt

Sometimes there's caffeine in ice cream and that's why you can't fall asleep when you have an icy late night snack.

More than 80 percent of American adults consume caffeine regularly. That’s no surprise, what with a coffee shop seemingly on every corner and in every supermarket, and tiny $3 bottles of 5-hour Energy popping up like mushrooms wherever there’s a checkout counter. It turns out, though, that there is also caffeine in ice cream and frozen yogurt.

How does caffeine work in the body?

Caffeine works mainly by temporarily binding to adenosine receptors in the brain. That prevents adenosine, which is a natural sedative produced by the brain, from occupying those receptors and making us feel drowsy. Adenosine levels build up during waking hours and then drop as we sleep.

People who don’t use caffeine regularly and who haven’t developed a dependence on it “usually become significantly more alert and better able to perform cognitive and motor tasks – such as paying attention during boring tasks or typing – if they’re given the right dose of caffeine,” says Laura Juliano, a professor of psychology at American University in Washington, D.C.

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Magnesium-Rich Foods to Prevent a Stroke

Among foods to prevent a stroke, magnesium-rich foods are a good choice

More magnesium may mean a lower risk of stroke.

Researchers looked at seven studies that followed a total of roughly 240,000 people for eight to 15 years. The risk of an ischemic stroke was 9 percent lower for each 100 milligrams of magnesium the participants reported eating per day. This may seem like a low number, but simple changes or additions in diet may offer complementary benefits. Preparing foods to prevent a stroke will often coincide with eating foods that are good for your overall health.   Read More

What to Eat: Like Greek Yogurt? You Should Also Try Stonyfield’s Petite Crème

This low-fat smooth cheese is delicious and packed with protein

“Greek’s creamy French cousin.”

That’s how Stonyfield describes its Petite Crème, a low-fat smooth cheese made from cultured non-fat milk and cream and inspired by the French fromage blanc.

Act now to download your FREE copy of What to Eat: 10 Best Foods without cost or obligation!

Like greek yogurt,   Read More

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