Beware of These Effects of Caffeine on the Body

Caffeine is the most popular drug in the United States and the least regulated one.

Up until about two decades ago, the only foods with added caffeine were soft drinks. And the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) limited their amount of caffeine to 48 milligrams per eight ounces.

That changed in 1997, when the first popular energy drink—an Austrian import called Red Bull— landed on our shores. Every 8.4-ounce can of the sweetened fortified water contains 80 mg of caffeine.

Truths About the Benefits of Green Tea

Green tea is hot. You can buy a bottled green tea beverage just about anywhere these days. And food manufacturers are adding green tea or its extracts to everything from coffee to juice drinks.

How good is the evidence regarding the benefits of green tea and your health? Studies in laboratory animals are impressive, but compelling evidence in humans has been hard to come by.

Drinking tea regularly may be one of the most practical lifestyle changes you can make to significantly reduce your risk of suffering a stroke,” says epidemiologist Lenore Arab of the University of California at Los Angeles. Arab co-chaired the Fourth International Scientific Symposium on Tea and Human Health in 2007.

Want to Know How Much Caffeine is in Tea?

Tea is in. The average American drinks some 155 cups a year. That makes tea the country’s fourth most popular beverage, after water, soft drinks, and coffee.

There is no doubt that tea is an invigorating drink – probably due to how much caffeine is in tea (about half the caffeine of coffee).

And the national waistline would be far better off if we replaced some of that soda with tea (provided we sipped it with little or no sugar).

8 Examples of When Caffeine is Good for You

Most people rely on caffeine to stay alert. But researchers suggest that it may do far more—lowering the risk of Parkinson’s disease and gallstones, for example. Here’s what you may not know about the times that caffeine is good for you.

* This information does not apply to women who are pregnant (or trying to become pregnant) or to children. Nor does it apply to caffeine powder or highly concentrated liquid caffeine, which can be lethal.