Heart and Disease: Can BPA Raise Blood Pressure?

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical found in the inner coating of cans and in some plastic bottles. Some studies find higher blood levels of BPA in people who have cardiovascular disease. Now a study has tested whether BPA can raise blood pressure.

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Korean scientists gave soy milk to 60 people aged 60 or older on three occasions. The beverage was served in either cans or glass bottles (glass is BPA-free).

Two hours after drinking the beverage from either kind of container, systolic blood pressure had dropped (possibly because of the soy milk). But it fell 5 points less after the participants drank the soy milk from the cans than after they drank it from the glass bottles.

What to do: Try to buy foods in glass bottles or cartons rather than cans. This study doesn’t prove that BPA causes high blood pressure over the long term, but why not play it safe? Also, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences has ex¬pressed concern about BPA’s “effects on the brain, behavior, and prostate gland in fetuses, infants, and children.”

Source: Hypertension 2014. doi:10.1161HYPERTENSIONAHA.114.04261.

Other relevant links:

• Two recent studies reveal what you can do to avoid atrial fibrillation. See: Heart and Disease: What Can Lower Your Risk of Atrial Fibrillation?

• Watch out for pre-hypertension. See: Heart and Disease: Risk Rises Before Your Blood Pressure is “High”

• More about BPA. See: Can the BPA

6 Replies to “Heart and Disease: Can BPA Raise Blood Pressure?”

  1. I think there is a mistake in this article. If the systolic BP dropped when soy milk was drunk from the cans, why then would you say to buy only from glass or cartons? Isn’t it good that the systolic was lowered?

  2. Am I reading this wrong? ‘Two hours after drinking the beverage from either kind of container, systolic blood pressure had dropped (possibly because of the soy milk). But it fell 5 points more after the participants drank the soy milk from the cans than after they drank it from the glass bottles.’ It sounds like the soy from cans lowered BP better than soy from glass.

  3. Isn’t the outcome stated in error? If blood pressure dropped more after drinking from cans, why would the conclusion be to drink more from glass bottles?

  4. Huh? Am I reading this correctly or was this a typo?

    “But it fell 5 points more after the participants drank the soy milk from the cans than after they drank it from the glass bottles.”

    If this is a correct quote, then the headlines are very misleading. Why would I want to avoid cans when drinking from them causes a drop in my blood pressure which is a good thing? Of course, there are myriad of other reasons for not drinking from cans.

  5. Apparently I am reading this wrong because if systolic bp dropped more after drinking from the bpa cans than after drinking from the non-bpa bottles it would seem to me that the results could indicate that drinking from bpa containers lowers blood pressure.

  6. I’m confused… A drop in systolic blood pressure is often a good thing and an extra 5 points less would be an even greater improvement so why is this study concluding that BPA has a negative impact?

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