Antibiotics in meat and poultry resulting in dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria

The Director-General of the World Health Organization was blunt. The world is facing “an end to modern medicine as we know it,” Margaret Chan warned last year. Strep throats could once again kill people, and hip replacements, organ transplants, and cancer chemotherapy “would become far more difficult or even too dangerous to undertake.” That’s because we’re losing our first-line antimicrobial drugs to antibiotic resistance, Chan noted. As for new antibiotics to replace them, Chan wasn’t optimistic: “The pipeline is virtually dry. The cupboard is nearly bare.”

How to Sanitize a Sponge: Are Your Kitchen Sponges Safe?

“Sponges are usually the dirtiest thing in the kitchen and difficult to keep clean,” says microbiologist Manan Sharma of the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety Laboratory in Beltsville, Maryland

NSF International offers good reason to know how to sanitize a sponge; in a recent survey of U.S. homes they found 77 percent of the sponges and dish cloths contained coliform bacteria, 86 percent had yeast and mold, and 18 percent had Staph bacteria. NSF International is a non-profit agency that sets safety standards for water filters and other equipment.