Healthy Food Quiz: Questions and Answers to Help You Fight Disease

Most people know that calcium is good for bones, fiber is good for constipation, and iron is good for blood, to name a few. But once you go beyond the basics, the picture gets murky.

Here’s a healthy food quiz (questions and answers included) to see how well you know which foods or nutrients can prevent or promote which diseases.

Feel free to cheat. The questions aren’t really a test of how well you read (and remember) every issue of Nutrition Action. They’re just a sneaky way to get you to look at the answers, which contain a wealth of information on how your diet affects your health.

The Risks of Eating and Drinking Aloe Vera

Aloe vera, which comes from a succulent plant, is sold as a juice and is added to foods, supplements, and skin care products. But just because it’s natural doesn’t mean it’s safe to eat.

Carefully conducted studies by the U.S. government concluded that there was “clear” evidence that aloe vera extracts caused intestinal cancers in male and female rats, but not mice, when consumed. (Applying aloe vera on the skin is not likely to cause harm.)

Is Paleo Healthy? Should We Be Eating Like Cave Men and Women?

“If it wasn’t on a caveman’s menu, it shouldn’t be on yours.” That’s the basic premise of a Paleo diet. The question remains, as it should for any diet—is Paleo healthy?

Maybe you’ve heard of the Nordic diet, the Mediterranean diet, and more recently, the gluten-free diet, but these are all very different from the primal diet known as Paleo.

But is the Paleo diet healthy?

Low Sugar Breakfast Ideas for Kids

Want your kids — or other family members — to eat more fruit for breakfast? Make sure their cereal is low in sugar.

Researchers randomly assigned 91 children aged 5 to 12 to choose one of three low sugar breakfast cereals (Cheerios, Corn Flakes, or Rice Krispies) or one of three high sugar cereals (Cocoa Puffs, Froot Loops, or Frosted Flakes). The kids also had unlimited access to low-fat milk, orange juice, bananas, strawberries, and packets of sugar.

How to Sanitize a Sponge: Are Your Kitchen Sponges Safe?

“Sponges are usually the dirtiest thing in the kitchen and difficult to keep clean,” says microbiologist Manan Sharma of the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety Laboratory in Beltsville, Maryland

NSF International offers good reason to know how to sanitize a sponge; in a recent survey of U.S. homes they found 77 percent of the sponges and dish cloths contained coliform bacteria, 86 percent had yeast and mold, and 18 percent had Staph bacteria. NSF International is a non-profit agency that sets safety standards for water filters and other equipment.