Walking vs. Running to Lose Weight

“Want to lose weight? Then run, don’t walk,” reported U.S. News & World Report in the April 2013 issue.

When it comes to running vs. walking, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California conducted a six year National Walkers’ and Runners’ Health Study. When they compared men and women who increased their walking or running, they found that running expended more energy than walking.

But people who choose to run may be different—they may be more physically fit, for example—than people who choose to walk.

Should You Drink Chocolate Milk After a Workout?

“Beverage of champions: Chocolate milk gets an Olympic-style makeover,” reported the Washington Post in January after ads featuring U.S. Olympic athletes began popping up during the Sochi winter games. Olympic athletes have access to the best in exercise regimens and health and nutrition advice. If they drink chocolate milk post workout, should you?

When it comes to recovering from intense exercise, this classic childhood beverage has taken the spotlight.

In some studies, drinking chocolate milk immediately after a strenuous workout is one of the best ways to recover quickly—better than sugary sports drinks like Gatorade. The milk’s naturally occurring sugar (lactose) is half glucose, its protein speeds up glycogen synthesis in the body, and its electrolytes (like potassium and, to a lesser extent, sodium) help you rehydrate.