Antibiotics in meat and poultry resulting in dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria

The Director-General of the World Health Organization was blunt. The world is facing “an end to modern medicine as we know it,” Margaret Chan warned last year. Strep throats could once again kill people, and hip replacements, organ transplants, and cancer chemotherapy “would become far more difficult or even too dangerous to undertake.” That’s because we’re losing our first-line antimicrobial drugs to antibiotic resistance, Chan noted. As for new antibiotics to replace them, Chan wasn’t optimistic: “The pipeline is virtually dry. The cupboard is nearly bare.”

The Dangers of Quorn Products You Should Know

Mycoprotein, the novel ingredient in Quorn-brand frozen meat substitutes, is made from processed mold (Fusarium venenatum), can cause serious and even fatal allergic reactions.

Though the manufacturer’s (Marlow Foods) advertising and labeling implied that the product is “mushroom protein” or “mushroom in origin,” the mold (or fungus) from which it is made does not produce mushrooms. Rather, the mold is grown in liquid solution in large tanks.

Healthy Food Quiz: Questions and Answers to Help You Fight Disease

Most people know that calcium is good for bones, fiber is good for constipation, and iron is good for blood, to name a few. But once you go beyond the basics, the picture gets murky.

Here’s a healthy food quiz (questions and answers included) to see how well you know which foods or nutrients can prevent or promote which diseases.

Feel free to cheat. The questions aren’t really a test of how well you read (and remember) every issue of Nutrition Action. They’re just a sneaky way to get you to look at the answers, which contain a wealth of information on how your diet affects your health.

The Benefits of Polyunsaturated Fats in Your Diet

The benefits of polyunsaturated fats in your diet may include lower levels of inflammation and less buildup of plaque in arteries. This is important, because “Inflammation plays two key roles in coronary heart disease,” explains Penny Kris-Etherton of Pennsylvania State University.

First, it helps build the plaque that narrows arteries. The process starts when the immune system mobilizes to heal an “injury” in the artery wall, often caused by oxidized LDL cholesterol. Smoking, high blood pressure, and high blood sugar can also damage the arteries and lead to plaque buildup.“

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And every single step of the way, inflammatory signals produced in the plaque fuel the process,” says Kris-Etherton. After decades, the plaque—now filled with cholesterol, calcium, and cell debris—gets covered with a fibrous cap of smooth muscle cells. Then, once again, inflammation wreaks havoc.