5 Foods You Shouldn't Eat for Breakfast

“Dessert for breakfast is a trend that we have been following for several years,” Eleanor Hanson of Foodwatch recently told Restaurants & Institutions magazine. Foodwatch is an Edina, Minnesota, consulting firm that analyzes food trends.

“We’re seeing streusel in cereal, chocolate in muffins and scones, and monster-size cinnamon rolls. Blurring is occurring on the sweets continuum.” In light of this continuing trend, we’ve put together a short list of 5 foods you shouldn’t eat for breakfast.

We examined nutrition information supplied by the manufacturers of popular breakfast items from fast- food chains and supermarkets. The results should sound a wake-up call. If restaurant foods came with the same “Nutrition Facts” labels that are on all packaged foods, the lines at Tim Hortons, McDonald’s, and Burger King might be a lot shorter.

The 4 Safest Sugar Substitutes and a Few to Avoid Completely

The best and safest artificial sweeteners are erythritol, xylitol, stevia leaf extracts, neotame, and mon fruit extract—with some caveats:

• Erythritol: Large amounts (more than about 40 or 50 grams or 10 or 12 teaspoons) of this sugar alcohol sometimes cause nausea, but smaller amounts are fine. (Sensitivities vary among individuals.) Erythritol, small amounts of which occur naturally in some fruits, is about 60 to 70 percent as sweet as table sugar and has at most one-twentieth as many calories. Unlike the high-potency sweeteners, erythritol provides the bulk and “mouth feel” of sugar.

• Xylitol: This sugar alcohol, which occurs naturally in birch and some other plants, is about as sweet as table sugar and has about three quarters of the calories. Too much xylitol (about 30–40 grams or 7–10 teaspoons, although sensitivities vary) could produce a laxative effect and/or gastrointestinal distress.

The Best Coffee Creamers, Drinks, and Sweeteners

The creamer aisle is hot. From caramel macchiato, crème brûlée, and white chocolate caramel latte to Almond Joy, Cinnabon, and Hershey’s, it’s no longer just a question of “Cream or sugar?”

And it’s not just creamer. Starbucks, Silk, International Delight, and others now sell ready-to-drink coffee in bottles, cartons, or cans. It’s a whole new Joe out there.

Here’s a quick cruise through the creamer and coffee aisles.