Healthy Foods to Eat on a Gluten-Free Diet

Stomach pain, diarrhea, weight loss. Those are some of the symptoms of celiac disease, which is an autoimmune reaction to gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye.

At least one out of 100 Americans have celiac. Most of them don’t know it. And studies suggest that some people who don’t have the disease still can’t tolerate gluten. So what are some healthy foods to eat on a gluten-free diet?

First, let’s answer a few questions with Dr. Joseph Murray, a gastroenterologist and professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

How to Purée Vegetables and Reduce Calories

Call it sneaky. Call it smart. Once you know how to purée vegetables, you can secretly swap those puréed vegetables for other ingredients in some dishes, people will eat fewer calories and won’t notice the difference. This is also a great trick for eating fewer calories for people interested in losing weight. You can also use puréed vegetables as a way to change things up with your regular recipes.

If you puree vegetables, will you reduce calories consumed?

Researchers at Pennsylvania State University offered 41 young men and women breakfast, lunch, and dinner once a week for three weeks.

At each meal, one dish—the carrot bread for breakfast, the macaroni and cheese for lunch, and the chicken-and-rice casserole for dinner—contained puréed vegetables in place of other ingredients.

Is Paleo Healthy? Should We Be Eating Like Cave Men and Women?

“If it wasn’t on a caveman’s menu, it shouldn’t be on yours.” That’s the basic premise of a Paleo diet. The question remains, as it should for any diet—is Paleo healthy?

Maybe you’ve heard of the Nordic diet, the Mediterranean diet, and more recently, the gluten-free diet, but these are all very different from the primal diet known as Paleo.

But is the Paleo diet healthy?

A Healthy Mediterranean Diet

“Mediterranean diet fights heart disease,” announced ABC News. “Mediterranean diet cuts risk of stroke,” said USA Today. “Mediterranean diet over low fat? Well, at least it’s more fun,” quipped the Los Angeles Times. A study published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine set off a media frenzy in February. Its findings were striking, but the press reports may have misled many. Here’s what the study actually found…and how it should (or shouldn’t) alter what you eat.