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Dear health-conscious consumer,

You should have the latest life-saving information about the foods you eat. And that’s why we’ve developed this Web site, NutritionAction.com®. So you can get candid, reliable, and useful information from our nutritionists and scientists…

Michael F. Jacobson, Ph.D.

Michael F. Jacobson, Ph.D.
Founder and Executive Editor

Dear health-conscious consumer,

You should have the latest life-saving information about the foods you eat. And that’s why we’ve developed this Web site, NutritionAction.com®. So you can get candid, reliable, and useful information from our nutritionists and scientists…

Current Nutrition Action Daily Tips

What are the Best Frozen Desserts with Lower Calories?

Can you spot the best frozen desserts with lower calories? Here’s what’s hot in frozen yogurt and light ice cream.

The frozen-dessert aisle sure isn’t frozen in time.

Häagen-Dazs now has an Artisan Collection with mix-ins like banana rum swirl. Ben & Jerry’s has a line with a “core” of fillings like peanut butter fudge. And nearly every brand now has a line of gelato.

But if you’re careful, you can still cool off without a calorie, sugar, and saturated fat overload. Some of the best frozen desserts, like yogurts and kefirs, even offer a decent dose of protein and calcium. Here’s the scoop.
  Read More

A Quick History of The Omniheart Diet

The Omniheart diet has come a long way since the first study. Here is where it began.

What foods belong in your fridge if you want to protect your heart and cut your risk of diabetes and cancer at the same time?

As long as you start with a healthy core diet—heavy on the fruits and vegetables and light on the bad fats, salt, and sweets—it’s up to you.

That’s what is so great about the Omniheart diet; you can round out your core diet with good fats, good protein, or good carbs. Or you can switch from one to the other, depending on your mood.
  Read More

Is There a Good Way to Exercise to Reduce Diabetes Risks?

How can I exercise to reduce diabetes risks? It's not as difficult or time-consuming as you might think.

In 2002, the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) found that a combination of a low-calorie, low-fat diet plus exercise reduces the risk of diabetes more than metformin (a blood-sugar-lowering drug) or a placebo in people at high risk for the disease. Seven years after the three-year trial ended, the weight loss and exercise were still paying off.

Among 1,416 women in the DPP who had no history of diabetes during pregnancy, those who had been in the weight loss + exercise group had a 30 percent lower risk of being diagnosed with diabetes since the study ended than those who got metformin or the placeb   Read More

The Bottom Line: Foods with Trans Fat are Lingering

Foods with trans fat are finally on the way out, but the food industry is working to keep this deadly ingredient in foods.

Hooray!

On June 17th, the Food and Drug Administration ended a battle that started a quarter century ago. The FDA banned partially hydrogenated oil, the source of artificial trans fat. The food industry will ask the FDA to allow specific amounts in certain foods, but I hope the FDA permits only levels that won’t harm consumers.

Food with trans fat entered our food supply more than a century ago, when chemists found that reacting liquid oils with hydrogen turned them into more-solid fats. That led to shortenings like Crisco (which replaced lard, butter, and beef tallow) and stick margarines. After World War II, the floodgates opened. Partially hydrogenated oils were cheap and shelf stable, and companies began to use them in thousands of foods.   Read More

Beware of These Effects of Caffeine on the Body

Like any drug, the effects of caffeine on the body are not wholly good or bad. Here are the facts.

Caffeine is the most popular drug in the United States and the least regulated one.

Up until about two decades ago, the only foods with added caffeine were soft drinks. And the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) limited their amount of caffeine to 48 milligrams per eight ounces.

That changed in 1997, when the first popular energy drink—an Austrian import called Red Bull— landed on our shores. Every 8.4-ounce can of the sweetened fortified water contains 80 mg of caffeine.   Read More

The Truth About Your Garlic Supplement

Is garlic cholesterol's natural enemy? This definitive study of garlic sandwiches and garlic pills says no way.

“Clinically proven to lower cholesterol.” “Promotes healthy circulation.” “Supports a healthy cardiovascular system.”

None of these typical claims from garlic supplement labels are backed by good scientific evidence.

Here is the evidence around cholesterol, blood clotting, heart attacks, and other health conditions that a garlic supplement is supposedly good for.
  Read More

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